Friday , May 26 2017
Home / Wireless Router / ASUS RT-AC5300 Wireless AC5300 Tri-Band Gigabit Router, AiProtection with Trend Micro for Complete Network Security

ASUS RT-AC5300 Wireless AC5300 Tri-Band Gigabit Router, AiProtection with Trend Micro for Complete Network Security

ASUS RT-AC5300 Wireless AC5300 Tri-Band Gigabit Router, AiProtection with Trend Micro for Complete Network Security

ASUS RT-AC5300 Wireless AC5300 Tri-Band Gigabit Router, AiProtection with Trend Micro for Complete Network Security

  • Tri-band (dual 5 GHz, single 2.4 GHz) with the latest 802.11ac 4×4 technology for maximum throughput (5334 Mbps) and coverage (up to 5,000 sq. ft.)
  • MU-MIMO technology enables multiple compatible clients to connect at each client’s respective maximum speed
  • Built-in access to WTFast Gamers Private Network (GPN) of route-optimized servers ensures low, stable ping times for gaming
  • AiProtection Powered by Trend Micro provides multi-stage protection from vulnerability detection to protecting sensitive data
  • ASUS Smart Connect delivers consistent bandwidth by dynamically switching devices between 2.4 and 5 GHz bands based on speed, load and signal strength
  • ASUS Ranked “Highest Customer Satisfaction with Wireless Routers in the U.S.”- J.D. Power

Wireless-AC5300 Tri-band Gigabit Router with 5330 Mbps throughput for smooth up to 4K/UHD video playback, support Air Protection, MU-MIMO, Link aggregation with teaming ports and Tri-Band Smart Connect

List Price: $ 399.99

Price: $ 278.95

More Wireless Router Products

Check Also

41Onjgs-NnL._SL160_

Tenda AC6 Dual Band 1200Mbps 11AC 802.11g/n/b/a WPS WDS VPN Firewall Wireless Repeater Router (AC6, Black)

Tenda AC6 Dual Band 1200Mbps 11AC 802.11g/n/b/a WPS WDS VPN Firewall Wireless Repeater Router (AC6, …

3 comments

  1. 279 of 293 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    USB 3.0 easily jams this router’s Wi-Fi, December 15, 2014
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    Purchased this router in January 2014 and have had no issues. Firmware is still at 3.0.0.4.374, hardware version is A1. I purchased this router after I bricked a Cisco router from a bad firmware update. I’m writing this review (actually more of a potential solution) because I noticed a little over 10% of the reviews are 1 star (which is “normal” percentage of any product) and after scanning through the 1 stars the common theme is intermittent wi-fi drops and “weird” router behavior when using the USB 3.0 port. Something to be aware of is that USB 3.0 ports, cables, and devices transmit on the 2.4 GHz – 2.5 GHz range. From the Intel White Paper:

    “As previously shown in Figure 2-2, the noise from USB 3.0 data spectrum can be high
    (in the 2.4-2.5 GHz range). This noise can radiate from the USB 3.0 connector on a
    PC platform, the USB 3.0 connector on the peripheral device or the USB 3.0 cable. If
    the antenna of a wireless device operating in this band is placed close to any of the
    above USB 3.0 radiation channels, it can pick up the broadband noise. The broadband
    noise emitted from a USB 3.0 device can affect the SNR and limit the sensitivity of any
    wireless receiver whose antenna is physically located close to the USB 3.0 device. This
    may result in a drop in throughput on the wireless link.”

    I experienced this when I built a new computer and placed the router on top of the tower on my desk and plugged my Patriot USB 3.0 thumb drive in the USB 3.0 port on top of the tower which is about 8 inches from the router antenna. My desktop is Ethernet, so was not affected. Laptop1 was using 5.0 GHz band and was not affected. Laptop2 was using 2.4 GHz band and could not connect wirelessly. Took an hour to figure this out (only variable that changed was distance of thumb drive to antenna). My old computer’s USB 3.0 port was at the bottom back of the tower and farther away. So basically, USB 3.0 acts as a router wi-fi jammer if located too close and it’s easy to mistake this common issue as a router intermittent wi-fi drop issue.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. 120 of 128 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The best prosumer router now available, but overkill for less active networks., February 9, 2016
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I normally don’t write long reviews, but thought due to our interesting networking environment, this review may be helpful for others contemplating this Asus AC88U router in more complex situations.

    The short summary is that this router has been very capable and refined out of the box (contrary to what some professional reviewers have claimed as “beta” with some Asus routers and users), with only the slightest of “glitches” that should be remedied as the firmware matures. It was a sufficient enough improvement in a very busy mixed network to replace our old workhorse AC68U. For those with the most active networks, the AC88U is probably the current SOTA and should squeeze every last ounce of performance from it.

    We have what is best described as a mixed-protocol, mixed-device, high-activity, network. Much of it is wired gigabit ethernet, but with a heavy supporting load of wireless 2.4 and 5 ghz clients, from legacy G to the latest AC Wi-Fi devices. Our broader network has three laser printers/MFPs (including color models), a Mac running OS X server with outboard RAID stack serving 10+TB of local data, three other Mac clients, three PC laptops, two PC workstations, a LAG-ethernet connected NAS unit for all local backups, six Squeezeboxes (wired and wireless) served by LMS locally, five Apple TVs, two network-managed cable boxes, several other smart TVs, Android tablets and streaming clients (Amazon Fire and Roku), two networked BD players, no less than seven iOS devices running both N and AC Wi-Fi, two gaming consoles, a fully populated Cisco 24-port managed switch with multiple LAG connections, and about 2,500 total feet of gigabit ethernet cable to manage. And a fairly active 2.4 ghz guest network on top of all of it for the regular in-law and neighbor visitors and all their devices. The longest Wi-Fi run is about 65 ft through 5-6 walls and across four levels (I do not believe in local repeaters or APs for security reasons). We run our 175/12 ISP WAN pretty much at its limit, with monthly activity typically in the 300-400+ GB range. At any given time, there are never less than 26-28 active clients on our network. Most activity is multiple-client, higher bitrate HD video and audio streaming, and regular larger data transfers, including multiple TimeMachine, local and off-site server backup routines. With all local data, HD video and audio traffic, Internet and cloud video streaming and data transfers, several RDC clients running, and continuous off-site server backups, our network is typically managing and moving hundreds of GB daily across many streams simultaneously. This is a heavy load for any router.

    We were among the first buyers of the AC68U as a result. It has been a stable device since day one, with incremental improvements as Asus has refined its firmware. To date, our old AC68U still does a capable job. It is good-looking, petite, and draws no attention to itself. It just does the job. Consequently, I would continue to recommend this now classic AC router for any but the most intense network environments. Where the 68U can now falter for us is on longer and fringe wireless AC and other 5ghz connections during heavier network activity, where speeds and latency can start to fall off. As a result, we started shifting some devices to the 2.4 ghz band to relieve the AC68U. Under peak network activity, some ethernet transfers would also experience a slight drop off (from 100-105 MB/s to perhaps 75-80).

    Enter the AC88U. It has several features that helped wring some additional capacity and headroom out of our busy network. The LAG feature is a legitimate IEEE 802.3ad setup, and allows a 2GB pipeline from our server to both Wi-Fi and Ethernet clients. Previously, a LAG connection was confined to Ethernet-side only. The AC88U’s more robust 5 ghz hardware delivers stronger and more stable fringe connections than the 68U, and with more headroom. We can move all our clients back over to 5 ghz with no speed drop off. The AC88U can support multiple HD video streams on all of them simultaneously without any compromises. Fringe 5 ghz devices previously connecting to the 68U at 125-150 mb are now rock solid at 350-400+ mb. Older 5 ghz clients such as the Intel 6300 AGN series are now holding stable connections at or just under 300 Mbps across much longer distances.

    Updating the 88U to the latest firmware was an easy affair, taking under 3 minutes. Migration from the 68U to the 88U was fairly painless, with a settings save and upload between them transferring about 80% of our router settings over to the new router. However, some settings need to be manually re-entered, and all settings should be double-checked. I imagine similar later model Asus routers will have a similar experience.

    Based on our testing, the AC88U’s more robust processing and transmitting power has improved…

    Read more

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. 58 of 61 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Expensive, but great., March 9, 2016
    By 
    StevieB

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: ASUS RT-AC5300 Wireless AC5300 Tri-Band Gigabit Router, AiProtection with Trend Micro for Complete Network Security (Personal Computers)
    Amazing router, even though it’s expensive. I replaced my RTN66U “Dark Knight” router with a Netgear nighthawk, and was thoroughly unimpressed. It had broadcast issues, and performed poorly on NetSpot testing in a relatively small home.
    THIS router has two 5Ghz bands, so the coverage issue I experienced with the Netgear were immediately solved. The 5Ghz coverage is as good as the 2.4Ghz band because of this. Now, I can attach more devices to the 5Ghz band, and free up bandwidth on the 2.4 band.
    I prefer the Asus UI to Netgear’s. It has a more intuitive look and feel to me, and it seems more powerful as well for the users who are more experienced and knowledgeable in setting up home networking.

    I’ve attached wireless speedtests from my router through google fiber. Tests were done about 15 feet from the router.

    ********4 month update********
    Added a photo from pulling a file from my NAS to my laptop. Speeds average 7MB/s when reading. NAS is connected via powerline ethernet adaptors, computer was wireless.
    For anyone complaining that this router can’t handle gigabit speeds, see my “connected” speedtest. This was done connected to the router via cat5 ethernet cable into my Dell XPS 13 with a USB3.0 ethernet adapter. Note that in the screenshot I included the systray to show the laptop being in airplane mode. I have Google Fiber, and the reason the download isn’t FASTER, is because I also have their TV service. The TV leeches bandwidth from your connection, to the tune of about 250-300Mbps because of the lower compression google uses to deliver higher quality television broadcasts. However as you can see on the upload portion, it handled gigabit speeds easily.

    I also do a TON of media streaming in my home. This is primarily why I bought this router. I have tried and succeeded streaming up to three 1080p movies from my Synology NAS to my Roku 3, Roku 2, and PS3 which are all connected wirelessly.

    It’s my opinion that anyone complaining this doesn’t do gigabit speeds needs to check their own hardware/connection out, and not blame this router as it CLEARLY will do all it says it will.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *